The Lincoln Highway in Basin and Range – Ibapah, Far Western Utah

I must say that Ibapah has acquired something of a mystique amongst Lincoln Highway enthusiasts and I’m certainly one of those who feels that way.

In recent years it was the only location with gasoline between Ely and Tooele, but now even that has changed with the closing of the Ibapah Trading Post. Also it’s about as far west as you can go in Utah or the first place you come to after leaving Nevada; and it’s really isolated. Additionally there’s the Goshute Indian Reservation right there, straddling the state line

The Ibapah Trading Post – Sheridan’s Ranch

The Sheridan Ranch had been a Pony Express and stage stop in days gone by. One of the houses became a general store known now as the Ibapah Trading Post.

Ibapah Trading Post

Sadly this benchmark of any LHW trip is not currently open although there are rumors of it being available for the centennial in 2013. Do ask at the house and they will let you look around. I found it sadly rundown and neglected. Here are a few more photographs:

Trading Post Front Porch

Log Cabin, Ibapah Trading Post

Sheridan Hotel at Ibapah Trading Post

Owen Sheridan advertized his hotel in the 1916 Lincoln Highway Guide.

Sheridan Hotel Ad – 1916 Lincoln Highway Guide

South of Ibapah

Deep Creek Mountains, Ibapah

Did I mention that the scenery is gorgeous? The area is watered from Deep Creek which supports a lively ranching and farming community.

Finally, since you must travel through the Goshute Reservation if you come from or are heading to the south, respect the tribe. It’s their land.

Goshute Reservation Boundary

Until next time, travel wisely and safely.

Grover

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6 Responses to The Lincoln Highway in Basin and Range – Ibapah, Far Western Utah

  1. Anne Duffy says:

    Beautiful photos! I was doing some genealogical research and found a story from a family member about my husband’s grand uncle, who came to America from Ireland with his cousin, Owen Sheridan. The story gives a bit of history about how Owen bought 610 acres in Utah and started a grocery store and pig farm. There is even a picture of the general store, which at that time said “Owen Sheridan General Store”. Even though it was taken many years earlier, it looks remarkably similar to your photo of the Ipabah Trading Post above. I was just curious if you knew of any other history of Owen Sheridan. It seems our family lost contact with him sometime after he turned approx. 79 years old.

    • clevelandg says:

      Yes, that is the Sheridan General Store and Sheridan’s Hotel. It was known as the Sheridan Ranch and is now the Ibapah Trading Post.
      There is a brief mention here: http://www.feltonline.com/familyhistory/felt/Early_History_Of_Ibapah.htm
      I haven’t found much more.

    • Joan O'Gorman nee Duffy, Naas, Co. Kildare Ireland says:

      Hallo Anne,
      I think I am on the same trail as you! your uncle Francis would have been my grandfather’s brother, Hugh, the RIC constable. His son, Hugo was my late father, and I have a copy of your family stories written for the 1991 Reunion for the Duffys and McCabes, it is a fund of wonderful information about the Duffy family, about which we knew nothing
      I think we are talking about the same photo in that booklet, it has a lady sitting in the car with a man posed beside the car outside Owen Sheridans General Store.
      I think a lady called Mary Duffy (She may have been a nurse?) gave it to my father and he gave it to me. My son was searching on the Internet and found this beautiful site and was very surprised to come across the photo almost the same as “ours” in the booklet.
      Hope you are making good progress with your family research.

      • Anne Duffy says:

        Hi, Joan! What a great surprise. E-mail me at abugs4@gmail.com when you have some time. I am still determined to find some more info. on Owen Sheridan, but I’d love to chat with you as well.

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